This Little Piggy…

It’s SATURDAY!!!!!!!!!!!! Can you believe it! It’s finally here – it has been a looooong week so me and the furbabies are very happy today! Hmm, what shall I share with you today?  How about the “little Piggy” rhyme everybody has either had played on their toes or has played on a baby’s toe? Play it on somebody’s toe today!  Love and feathers, Auntie Goose

this little piggy-1Original

Random images that I found on the web…’G’ rated ones only!…In no particular order…

Little Jack Horner

Hey kiddies! How is your Friday-Eve going? Looking forward to the weekend? I certainly am! My plans are to snuggle down in my nest and sleep. Just don’t get into trouble like Little Jack Horner did! The rhyme is a little small so to read it you may have to click on the image to enlarge it! See you on Saturday!  Love and feathers, Auntie Goose

jack horner-1

Original

Other versions and various illustrations and other stuff (I don’t feel like organizing them, sorry!)

History

16th Century History origin of the Little Jack Horner story?
Little Jack Horner was reputed to have been the Steward to Richard Whiting (1461 – 1539) the Bishop of Glastonbury. The Steward had an important role and was responsible for managing the household, collecting taxes and keeping accounts.

The Church, the King and the Gold
Glastonbury was the largest and wealthiest Abbey in England and this Benedictine Monastery owned extensive lands and manors in the county of Somerset. Between 1536 and 1540, after breaking away from the Catholic Church, King Henry VIII and his chief minister Thomas Cromwell set about the systematic Dissolution of all of the Monasteries in England. The reason for was to loot the monasteries of their gold and silver and seize the monastic lands. By 1539 Glastonbury was the only religious house left in Somerset and it was only at matter of time before Glastonbury Abbey was also seized.

The Bribe
It is rumoured that the Bishop tried to bribe the King. He sent his Steward, Richard Whiting, with a gift of twelve title deeds to various English manorial estates. The deeds were said to have been secreted in a pie (valuables were often hidden in this bizarre fashion to thwart thieves). Whiting (Little Jack Horner) realised that the bribe would do no good and was said to have stolen the deeds to the manor of Mells (it being the real ‘plum’ of the twelve manors).

The Traitor and the Execution
The remaining eleven manors were given to the crown but to no avail. The old Bishop was convicted of treason for remaining loyal to Rome. The jury included his treacherous steward Horner who found Bishop Whiting guilty and sent the old man to a terrible death of being hung, drawn and quartered on Glastonbury Tor. The Abbey was destroyed. Following the destruction of the abbey the steward, Horner moved into the Manor of Mells. Whether Horner actually stole the deeds to the Manor or was rewarded with them for helping to convict the Bishop of Glastonbury is not known but the Manor of Mells became the property of the Horner family who lived there until the 20th century.

The first publication date for the lyrics to the Little Jack Horner rhyme is 1725.

16th Century History origin of the Little Jack Horner story?
Little Jack Horner was reputed to have been the Steward to Richard Whiting (1461 – 1539) the Bishop of Glastonbury. The Steward had an important role and was responsible for managing the household, collecting taxes and keeping accounts.

The Church, the King and the Gold
Glastonbury was the largest and wealthiest Abbey in England and this Benedictine Monastery owned extensive lands and manors in the county of Somerset. Between 1536 and 1540, after breaking away from the Catholic Church, King Henry VIII and his chief minister Thomas Cromwell set about the systematic Dissolution of all of the Monasteries in England. The reason for was to loot the monasteries of their gold and silver and seize the monastic lands. By 1539 Glastonbury was the only religious house left in Somerset and it was only at matter of time before Glastonbury Abbey was also seized.

The Bribe
It is rumoured that the Bishop tried to bribe the King. He sent his Steward, Richard Whiting, with a gift of twelve title deeds to various English manorial estates. The deeds were said to have been secreted in a pie (valuables were often hidden in this bizarre fashion to thwart thieves). Whiting (Little Jack Horner) realised that the bribe would do no good and was said to have stolen the deeds to the manor of Mells (it being the real ‘plum’ of the twelve manors).

The Traitor and the Execution
The remaining eleven manors were given to the crown but to no avail. The old Bishop was convicted of treason for remaining loyal to Rome. The jury included his treacherous steward Horner who found Bishop Whiting guilty and sent the old man to a terrible death of being hung, drawn and quartered on Glastonbury Tor. The Abbey was destroyed. Following the destruction of the abbey the steward, Horner moved into the Manor of Mells. Whether Horner actually stole the deeds to the Manor or was rewarded with them for helping to convict the Bishop of Glastonbury is not known but the Manor of Mells became the property of the Horner family who lived there until the 20th century.

The first publication date for the lyrics to the Little Jack Horner rhyme is 1725.

Nursery rhymes, lyrics and origins

The Lion and The Unicorn

Good morning,kiddies! I’ve been away a few days – Auntie’s computer decided to go on vacation and it took tech support a few days to talk her into coming back to work. I lost a ton of stuff, but I don’t mind starting over fresh and new! (Thankfully my nursery rhymes were saved in a different location so I lost none of those!) Here’s my rhyme for the day, and if I can remember to, I will post a Sunday Funnies Page for tomorrow- maybe! Have a great weekend!  Love and Feathers, Auntie Goose

lion and unicorn-1

Original Version

The lion and the unicorn

Were fighting for the crown

The lion beat the unicorn

All around the town.

Some gave them white bread,

And some gave them brown;

Some gave them plum cake

and drummed them out of town.

 

 

the lion and the unicorn were fighting for the crown the lion beat the ...

The lion and the unicorn as they appear on both versions of the Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom. In the Scottish version (shown right) the two have switched places and both are crowned, and the lion on top is colored red.

Origins of “The lion and the unicorn” in British history
The Lion and the Unicorn lyrics date from 1603 when King James VI of Scotland became James I of England unifying the Scottish and English kingdoms. The ‘Virgin Queen’ Elizabeth 1 named the son of Mary Queen of Scots, James, as her heir. The union of the two countries required a new royal coat of arms combining those of England which featured two lions, and Scotland whose coat of arms featured two Unicorns hence “The lion and the unicorn”. A compromise was made thus the British coat of arms has one Lion and one Unicorn and the poem about hence “The Lion and the Unicorn” was created.

Lion and unicorn coat of armsThe picture depicts the Lion (with the crown) and the Unicorn Coat of Arms. The centre of the Arms depicts the lions of England in the first and fourth quarters, the lion of Scotland in the second and the Harp of Ireland in the third quarter. The motto around the centre means: “Evil to him who evil thinks” which relates to the Order of the Garter. The motto at the bottom means: “God and my Right ”  source here

 

If All the World was Apple Pie…

Hello kiddies, I hope you hugged and kissed your mommas yesterday! Just another rhyme for you, I hope you enjoy! This one is for all the east coast states who had to or have yet to suffer from the tropical storm  hitting right now. Love and Feathers, Auntie Goose

if all the world_0001

Original Version:

If all the world were apple pie,
And all the sea were ink,
And all the trees were bread and cheese,
What would we have to drink?
It’s enough to make an old man
Scratch his head and think.

If All the World Were Apple Pie - Mama Lisa's House of English Nursery Rhymes, Intro Image paper+world+PREVIEW

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe

Happy Saturday!! Are you ready for Mom’s Day? Just in from the back fence honking at Sissy Goose planning our lunch with Mom Goose – and it’s gonna be yummy!!!! Hope all you mom’s out there have a great day! Love and feathers, Auntie Goose

In Honor of Mother’s Day and all the mothers of fur children!!!

woman in a shoe_0001

Original 

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.
She had so many children, she didn’t know what to do;
She gave them some broth without any bread;
Then whipped them all soundly and put them to bed.

Enjoy the images I found on Google, in random order (Auntie Goose has a lot to do today so she must get on with her day!)